Saturday, March 17, 2018

Cell Phone Culture

Andy | Saturday, March 17, 2018 | Best Blogger Tips
In the UK, it is called a mobile, in Canada cell phone, in Latin America celular, in Japan keitai (portable), in China shou-ji (hand machine), in Bangladesh muthophone (phone in the palm of your hand), in Sweden nalle (teddy bear), in Israel Pelephone (wonder phone) and in Germany a handy. My thanks to Google and CNN for all that information.

25 comments:

  1. I do not know the American expression to speak cellular telephones but in France we can say " it is my pet peeve ". I hate, it is intrusive, the users are not discreet. But your photo is excellent

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  2. Very interesting. All People in each Country are looking at their Smartphone

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  3. Very interesting. All People in each Country are looking at their Smartphone

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  4. I call it an accident waiting to happen - don't text whilst walking down the stairs. I tried it !!!

    God bless.

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  5. And in Dutch we call it a Mobieltje (Little Mobile)!

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  6. Nice portrait of todays street live and an explanation with it. What can I wish more?

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  7. Teddy Bear ??? and yet I get it; as people certainly do get attached. I always ask why it's even called a phone since that is only one of its functions.
    The pink is a nice contrast with the grays.

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  8. What would people do without them? Talk to each other? ;-)

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  9. That's a lot of information I really didn't need to know! Funny thing is, I used my phone primarily for non-phone things. I keep records on it, play games on it, take some photos on it, use it as a GPS, etc. And every once in awhile I get a phone call which is usually some moron trying to send me on a "free" trip right after I pay the free fee.

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  10. And the French say portable, sometimes :) Others say brick, in slang :)

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  11. Yesterday, a young woman looking at her cell phone and walking down he street was headed right at me. I actually stopped in my tracks to avoid a crash. She finally saw me just inches away and said "oh, sorry" and walked on. I guess I'm attached to mine also, just not that attached.

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  12. I tend to alternate between mobile and cell phone in referring to them.

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  13. "Mobile" works out west, though whatever you call it, soon we'll have lost the ability to interact face-to-face, and we'll all need one built in.

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  14. I call it my stupid phone which I hardly use. I have it for emergencies and luckily I have none.

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  15. Call them what you will-- I find them a mixed blessing. I reach for mine too often. Your people pictures remind me of how good journalism USED to be.

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  16. Andy, William Ogburn, a sociologist, said that technology changes faster than norms and values. We are just working out when we should and should not use cell phones. Some people can not walk and talk at the same time.

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  17. Nice capture.
    Called 'mobile' here in Australia too.
    It's interesting what they are called in different countries.

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  18. We call it a cellphone here in NZ but it's quite sad to me that we as a society spend so much time on them.

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  19. Muy buena escena urbana, amigo... Buena captura

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  20. A joy and a curse. Hard to balance both feelings.

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  21. Buen retrato callejero que pone de manifiesto la dependencia que sufrimos con respecto al teléfono.
    Un saludo,

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