Wednesday, September 07, 2016

Tall Ship

Andy | Wednesday, September 07, 2016 | Best Blogger Tips
The original Bluenose was launched as a Grand Banks fishing and racing schooner on 26 March 1921 in Lunenburg, Nova Scotia. The ship pictured here is the Bluenose II a replica of the original. From the moment Bluenose took to the sea, it was evident she was a vessel unlike any other. When she took home her first Fishermen's Trophy in October of 1921, the legend began. During the next 17 years, no challenger American or Canadian could wrest the trophy from Bluenose. She earned the title "Queen of the North Atlantic" and was well on her way to becoming a Canadian icon.
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The majestic image of the Bluenose has adorned the Canadian dime since 1937 and three postage stamps, as well as the Nova Scotia license plate. In 1963, Bluenose II was launched. It was built by many of the same people who had worked on the original vessel at the same shipyard in Lunenburg. The project was financed by Oland Brewery to advertise their products, while also promoting Nova Scotia's maritime heritage and tourism. William RouĂ©, the designer of the original Bluenose, endorsed the vessel. Captain Walters sailed on the maiden voyage.
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The Mission: To continuously promote the history and legacy of Bluenose and Bluenose II as well as the rich past and present of Lunenburg and Atlantic Canada. To teach and promote seamanship and life skills in young Canadians through the opportunity of serving on board Bluenose II. To operate Bluenose II in a safe and efficient manner so that all Canadians may be proud. To maintain and ensure Bluenose II will serve as a sailing ambassador for Lunenburg, the Province of Nova Scotia and Canada.

17 comments:

  1. There were so much schooners in those days and now you can count them on the fingers of a single hand. A real pity if you see the beauty of this eco friendly transporters of earlier days.

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  2. I like to see those tall ships, they are so beautiful made with all that woods. It is nice to use it for teaching the seamanship to youngsters. Must be great to sail over the seas with this one.

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  3. So majestic and beautiful are the tall ships. Pity there are just not so many around these days.

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  4. That's a lot of rigging. I like the affect of the close and the far away in the first photo.

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  5. That is one spectacular ship! Thanks for providing all that history.

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  6. That is one elegant ship, it deserves it's iconic status.

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  7. Good evening Andy!
    Thank so much for your comments!

    Oh, thats beautiful shot from the tall ship! I like it! It's summerfeeling pur!
    Have a lucky week!
    Greetings from Hamburg,
    Britta

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  8. I seem to remember a ferry that made the crossing between Yarmouth and Portland being named after her.

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  9. These are such beautiful ships! I love seeing them.

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  10. What a wonderful ship, and your photos are really beautiful.

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  11. Those masts and sails are really impressive. I rode on one once while in Provincetown, Mass, and had the best time. It was a magical experience...but it was nothing like this. Great captures. genie

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