Saturday, March 25, 2017

European Common Reed

Andy | Saturday, March 25, 2017 | Best Blogger Tips
It is a beautiful plant to photograph but it is invasive and is causing damage to Ontario’s biodiversity, wetlands and beaches. Invasive Phragmites is a perennial grass that has been damaging ecosystems in Ontario for decades. It is not clear how it was transported to North America from its native home in Eurasia. It releases toxins from its roots into the soil to hinder the growth of and kill surrounding plants. While it prefers areas of standing water, its roots can grow to extreme lengths, allowing it to survive in relatively dry areas.

24 comments:

  1. It may be a pest but your photo of it sure is beautiful.

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  2. The plant looks nice with those plumes, we see it here too along the ditches and rivers. Never heard of it damages other plants.

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  3. ...it's becoming too common here, what a mess!

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  4. This is a very cool photo. But what can you do about this thing?

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  5. I had no idea, thank you for sharing this. It makes for a nice subject.

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  6. they make a lovely photo though, despite their toxicity...!

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  7. You've certainly photographed it beautifully.

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  8. We have it over here too. At least we know that it can be photographed brilliantly. Nice one Andy.

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  9. A very pretty view! You photographed it beautifully..

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  10. We have so many introduced species in North America. Not just plants but birds and animals, too. Their effects can be subtle and profound.

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  11. You hate to think that something makes it into your area and causes damage all around esp. like you said, its great to photograph.

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  12. Lovely photo of the grass and sky.
    That plant is a problem in some areas of Australia too.

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  13. This photo is very beautiful.
    I don't know if we have this one here.

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  14. As you say it does make for beautiful photography. Pity that it is so invasive.

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  15. I didn't know they were so invasive! I love the perspective of your photo, though - beautiful light!

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  16. Is it definitely invasive or could it be somehow nature's ecological solution to changes? perhaps it has some not-yet-understood benefit to us, the environment and increases biodiversity. http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2014/07/140724-invasive-species-conservation-biology-extinction-climate-science/

    There seems to exist an interesting parallel to issues around immigration..

    I quote a physician on the issue of health care for the uninsured in Canada:
    "In 1808 Canada’s population was ~ 480,000. At 36 + million we have increased our population 78 times. In those same 200 years most European nations ( England, France,n Germany, Italy) rose 2-5 times only). Canada is a new world nation. Our nation, our prosperity, everything about our heritage and strengths floe from wave upon wave of newcomer. We are a nation of Immigrants and Refugees. We 're all from different places. It is what makes us Canadian.
    By 2030 - 13 short years away more than 4 of every 5 new Canadians will arrive from away. Why would we treat so many of our future - so badly?
    Canada is top 5 of the world’s most prosperous nations and number 1/2 most admired. The relationship to the vigour and wellness of our newness is a major reason."

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  17. Without you mentioning it, I never would've known that was a problematic plant. Many times invasive species arrive incidentally from other parts of the globe via ships. Beautiful pic!

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