Tuesday, October 03, 2017

Canadian Warplane Heritage Museum

Andy | Tuesday, October 03, 2017 | Best Blogger Tips
Development of the Douglas DC-3 started in early 1935 with the prototype flying by the end of the year. The first production aircraft was delivered to American Airlines in July 1936. The US Air Corps became interested in the DC-3 and ordered a military version, called the C-47 or Dakota. It had many capabilities, including dropping paratroops and supplies, evacuating the wounded, troop transportation and glider towing. Eventually, about 10,000 C-47s were built for the US military.
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The Museum’s DC-3 Dakota displays the markings of RCAF No. 435 and 436 Squadrons, which operated in Burma during 1944-45 and whose slogan was "Canucks Unlimited". The DC-3 was built in June 1939 for Eastern Airlines, where it flew for over 13 years. In 1952, it went to North Central Airlines who operated it for another 11 years. The aircraft then left airline service, but continued to fly commercially until it was acquired by Dennis Bradley, who donated it to the Museum in 1981. It is one of the DC-3s currently still flying with over 82,000 hours in the air - equal to over 12 million miles, or 492 times around the world.

19 comments:

  1. ...Andy, these are wonderful images.

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  2. On the first one, the back light is just like mastered very well the centring. I like very much.
    The second allows us to see the end of its nose and the note is very Interesting.

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  3. A real workhorse of the past Andy.

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  4. Also played a central role in the Berlin airlift as I recall.

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    1. The Berlin airlift was a real challenge.

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  5. It seems to me that I flew to Africa on a U.S. Navy equivalent of a DC-3, but it had four engines. It was a memorable trip. We almost went off the end of the runway in the Azores on the way over and lost an engine over Canada on the way back! And again, your photographs are superb!

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    1. Thanks Lowell. I always look forward to you comments.

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  6. Beautiful! - one museum that's on my bucket list.

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  7. My dad would have called it a real work horse. It's a beautiful machine.
    Ha....I see one of your other commenters had the same idea.

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  8. Wonderful images, Andy. The plane has a storied history now more people can enjoy seeing it in the museum.

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  9. Andy, these are wonderful aircraft. They are still being flown commercially in Alaska and a number of other places. For many decades the DC-3 had the best safety record for a commercial aircraft, and may still hold that record today. Fine photos of this iconic plane.

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  10. So you have a place over there like our Duxford. Looks well worth going round

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  11. One of the great planes--- excellent pix!

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  12. I liked DC3's. I flew many long hours in them through the Arctic.

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  13. Wow! That's a classic "war horse" if I've ever seen one.

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  14. It once flew through the air, but now it lives in a cage.

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  15. Interesting to learn about these aircraft. It is remarkable how short the development time was in those days. Today it seems that planes are so complicated that they have a decade-long birth. I love the perspective on your top photo.

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